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The Effectively Wild Facebook group was created on August 5, 2013 and has over 9500 members as of January 2020. The group is public, and anyone can view or join.

Early history[]

The group was created by Tan Bao on August 5, 2013, whose first few actions were

(Times are given in Mountain time, since Tan lives in Alberta. That's right, the founder of the group is a Canadian.)

Occasionally, somebody will notice that Tan Bao is an administrator of the Facebook group and wonder if it's Sam's burner account.

Traditions[]

Playoff game mega-threads use the Noodle Rat as their main image.

Group member Kyle Lobner counts down to Opening Day by highlighting a different player each day with a post of the form "As of today there are N days left until Opening Day. By rWAR, last year's Nth most valuable player was..." If the start of the season is delayed (as it was in 2020 and 2022), he continues after the originally-scheduled Opening Day with "Today would have been day N of the yyyy MLB season. By WPA the top performer on day N of the yyyy-1 season was..."

The group organizes a baseball-themed Secret Santa gift exchange with a $20 gift budget. There are many posts in December from members expressing their appreciation, usually with pictures of Santa's well-chosen gift.

Recurring jokes[]

Pretty much all the Inside References on the podcast are also recurring jokes in the Facebook group.

Here are some that are prominent on the group but not on the podcast:

  • Whether a particular food item (especially a hot dog) qualifies as a sandwich.
  • Using the phrase "squid is fried" to mean "fired from their job". This phrase came to the attention of the podcast in Episode 851 as a Chinese idiom. The podcast didn't adopt it, but it has taken on a second life in the Facebook group. (To be fair, "fired" is itself an English idiom.)

Activities[]

2019-2020 Off-Season[]

During the Astros buzzer (non?-)scandal, the group mercilessly parodied the scandal by posting photos containing red circles highlighting suspicious wrinkles in the clothing of Little League players, politicians, movie characters, and even Ben Lindbergh.

2020 Season[]

Group member Paul Moorehead invited people to post their covers of the Stat Blast theme, offering a CAD$50 prize. Selected entries were featured on the podcast.

Group member Jonathan Mishory ran a "MLB Survivor" poll: Each round, members "voted out" their least-liked team. (This exercise was inspired by a similar series of polls on reddit a few years earlier.)

Poll Remarks
Round 1: March 16 Yankees out
Round 2: March 17 Astros out
Round 3: March 18 Cardinals out
Round 4: March 19 Red Sox out
Round 5: March 20 Cubs out
Round 6: March 21 Dodgers out
Round 7: March 22 Phillies out
Round 8: March 23 Indians out
Round 9: March 24 Braves out
Round 10: March 25 Marlins out
Round 11: March 26 Giants out
Round 12: March 27 Mets out
Round 13: March 28 Nationals out
Round 14: March 29 Rangers out
Round 15: March 30 Pirates out
Round 16: March 31 Brewers out
Round 17: April 1 Royals out
Round 18: April 2 Orioles out
Round 19: April 3 White Sox out
Round 20: April 4 Reds out
Round 21: April 5 Diamondbacks out
Round 22: April 6 Tigers out
Round 23: April 7 Angels out
Round 24: April 8 Rockies out
Round 25: April 9 Rays out
Round 26: April 10 Blue Jays out
Round 27: April 11 Twins out
Round 28: April 12 Padres out
Final: April 13 Mariners out
Winner: April 14 A's win

2021-2022 Off-Season[]

Group member Nick Bentley was inspired by Ben's remarks in Episode 1792 that, if you don't like the voting instructions for the Hall of Fame, you are welcome to create your own. So he did: The "EW Bizarro Hall of Fame" doesn't have a character clause, or indeed any clause at all. It is up to each voter's conscience to determine who is worthy of induction.

Building on a previous Facebook post (discussed in Episode 1790), the "EW Bizarro Hall of Fame" is a Congress-like Hall of Fame, with exactly two players from each district (mostly U.S. states), with eligibility determined by birthplace. Active players are eligible. The selection committee generally nominates the top 14 players by lifetime WAR, plus any notable players who missed the cut.

In theory, since every ballot casts two votes, the highest vote percentage is 50%, but in practice it can go higher due to partial ballots. (Some voters ignored the rules and voted for more than two, so that's a thing.)

District Player 1 Player 2 Notable runners-up
1 Alabama Henry Aaron (47%) Willie Mays (40%) Satchel Paige (10%)
2 Alaska¹ Yukon Cornelius (27%) Shawn Chacon (23%) Curt Schilling (18%)
3 Arizona² Ian Kinsler (38%) Cody Bellinger (27%) Rich Hill (18%)
4 Arkansas Brooks Robinson (43%) Lou Brock (26%) Arky Vaughn (15%)
5 California Ted Williams (40%) Barry Bonds (19%) Randy Johnson (12%)
6 Colorado Roy Halladay (55%) Goose Gossage (44%)
7 Connecticut Mo Vaughn (37%) George Springer (28%) Roger Connor (10%)
8 Delaware Paul Goldschmidt (55%) Delino DeShields (23%)
9 DC³ Maury Wills (49%) Nip Winters (18%) Bump Wills (17%)
10 Florida Chipper Jones (28%) Steve Carlton (23%) Tim Raines (11%)
11 Georgia Jackie Robinson (43%) Josh Gibson (33%) Ty Cobb (16%)
12 Hawaii Shane Victorino (37%) Ron Darling (22%) Charlie Hough (21%)
13 Idaho Harmon Killebrew (59%) Jason Schmidt (21%)
14 Illinois Rickey Henderson (46%) Jim Thorne (22%) Robin Yount (14%)
15 Indiana Scott Rolen (30%) Oscar Charleston (25%) Kenny Lofton (16%)
16 Iowa Bob Feller (50%) Dazzy Vance (29%) Cap Anson (11%)
17 Kansas Walter Johnson (52%) Heavy Johnson (18%) Joe Tinker (12%)
18 Kentucky Pee Wee Reese (43%) Jim Bunning (20%) Walker Buehler (15%)
19 Louisiana Mel Ott (40%) Vida Blue (16%) Ron Guidry (11%)
20 Maine Louis Sockalexis (33%) Bob Stanley (18%) George Gore (17%)
21 Maryland Babe Ruth (42%) Cal Ripken, Jr. (21%) Jimmie Foxx (14%)
22 Massachusetts Tom Glavine (27%) Rich Hill (20%) Jeff Bagwell (18%)
Connie Mack (14%)
23 Michigan John Smoltz (27%) Jim Abbott (19%) Charlie Gehringer (14%)
24 Minnesota Joe Mauer (36%) Paul Molitor (28%) Dave Winfield (21%)
25 Mississippi Cool Papa Bell (46%) Dave Parker (18%) Oil Can Boyd (14%)
26 Missouri Yogi Berra (42%) Max Scherzer (37%)
27 Montana Dave McNally (38%) John Gibbons (15%)
28 Nebraska Bob Gibson (45%) Wade Boggs (24%) Pete Alexander (20%)
29 Nevada Bryce Harper (51%) Kris Bryant (27%)
30 New Hampshire Chris Carpenter (37%) Brian Wilson (17%)
31 New Jersey Mike Trout (53%) Derek Jeter (21%) Billy Hamilton (NJ) (11%)
32 New Mexico Ralph Kiner (52%) Alex Bregman (25%) Vern Stephens (14%)
33 New York Lou Gehrig (34%) Sandy Koufax (26%)
34 North Carolina Catfish Hunter (23%) Buck Leonard (21%) Gaylord Perry (17%)
35 North Dakota Tavis Hafner (45%) Darin Erstad (41%)
36 Ohio Cy Young (32%) Mike Schmidt (28%) Roger Clemens (11%)
37 Oklahoma Mickey Mantle (40%) Johnny Bench (30%) Bullet Rogan (19%)
38 Oregon Dale Murphy (43%) Mickey Lolich (15%) Dave Kingman (13%)
39 Pennsylvania Stan Musial (29%) Ken Griffey, Jr. (28%) Honus Wagner (22%)
40 Puerto Rico Roberto Clemente (52%) Ivan Rodriguez (24%)
41 Rhode Island Napoleon Lajoie (47%) Paul Konerko (20%) Gabby Harnett (19%)
42 South Carolina Shoeless Joe Jackson (39%) Larry Doby (33%) Jim Rice (14%)
43 South Dakota Sparky Anderson (36%) Sean Doolittle (35%) Keith Foulke (17%)
44 Tennessee Mookie Betts (38%) Todd Helton (35%) Turkey Stearnes (27%)
45 Texas Greg Maddux (31%) Frank Robinson (20%) Nolan Ryan (16%)
46 Utah Bruce Hurst (41%) Who the f* are
these people? (23%)
47 Vermont Carlton Fisk (63%) Birdie Tebbetts (15%)
48 Virginia Justin Verlander (41%) Billy Wagner (24%) David Wright (18%)
49 Washington Ryne Sandberg (38%) Ron Santo (32%) John Olerud (12%)
50 West Virginia George Brett (46%) Jack Glasscock (33%)
51 Wisconsin Kid Nichols (42%) Al Simmons (25%) Addie Joss (18%)
52 Wyoming Brandon Nimmo (37%) Tom Browning (26%) Dick Ellsworth (13%)
53 Dominican Republic Pedro Martinez (44%) Albert Pujols (29%)
54 Venezuela Miguel Cabrera (37%) Felix Hernandez (22%) Johan Santana (17%)
55 Cuba Minnie Minoso (28%) Luis Tiant (21%) Martin Dihigo (18%)
56 Canada Fergie Jenkins (31%) Larry Walker (30%) Joey Votto (27%)
57 Mexico Fernando Valenzuela (62%) Vinnie Castilla (11%)
Oliver Perez (11%)
58 Panama Rod Carew (48%) Mariano Rivera (43%)
59 Japan Ichiro Suzuki (50%) Sadaharu Oh (23%) Shohei Ohtani (16%)
60 Elsewhere Bert Blyleven (32%)
(Netherlands)
Andruw Jones (25%)
(Curaçao)
Xander Bogaerts (10%)
(Aruba)
Notes

¹ Alaska: Yukon Cornelius is a fictitious character from the Rankin/Bass television special Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer. His victory is likely the result of protest votes against Curt Schilling, combined with the appeal of being the chaos candidate.
² Arizona: Rich Hill was a surprisingly strong write-in candidate, despite having been born in Massachusetts and therefore not being eligible at all.
³ DC: Nip Winters beat out Bump Wills by a single vote.
⁴ Maine: Bob Stanley beat out George Gore by a single vote.
⁵ Massachusetts: Rich Hill's alter ego Dick Mountain earned 2% of the vote.
⁶ Tennessee: Noodles Hahn + Turkey Stearnes produced a "food ballot" that had some popularity.
⁷ Utah: Second place was won by a write-in candidate.
⁸ Venezuela: Effectively Wild mascot Willians Astudillo earned three write-in votes.
⁹ Elsewhere: Countries that sent 50 or fewer players to the major leagues.

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